5 Ways to Assess Your Foot Health

Your good health is riding on two feet. Are you doing self-exams? 

ROSEMONT, Ill. (Aug. 23, 2016) – How often should you check your feet? If you’re an average walker, you take about 10,000 steps per day, which add up to more than 3 million steps per year. You’re also carrying approximately four to six times your body weight across the ankle joint when you climb stairs. This amounts to a lot of stress and strain on the feet and ankles. To make sure yours stay healthy, orthopaedic foot and ankle specialists recommend you examine your feet at least weekly.
 
Follow these five steps for your next foot self-exam:
 
Appearance: Look for things like swelling, discoloration of the skin or nails, blisters, excessive calluses and changes to the shape of your foot. Examine your soles and the spaces between your toes. If you’re not physically able to closely look at your feet, have a family member or friend help you. If you find anything unusual, especially since your last self-exam, see your primary doctor or contact an orthopaedic foot and ankle specialist near you.
 
Blood Flow: Press down on the nail of your big toe until the color blanches. Let go and allow the blood flow to return to your toe. The return of normal color should take two to five seconds in a person with average circulation.
 
Function: Try to pick up a marble or a small dish towel with just your toes to test their flexibility. To test your ankle flexibility, hang your heel over the edge of a stair while standing facing up the staircase. Now let the heel go below the level of the stair. If this causes pain, stop the test. If your heel goes below the level of the stair without causing strain in your calf, that is excellent. If there is some strain, this can be improved with flexibility exercises
 
Sensation: Take a pencil eraser and lightly run it on the top, bottom and both sides of your feet. The sensation should feel equal in all quadrants. It may tickle on the bottom of the feet. That is normal
 
Pain: If you have pain, feel parts of your foot for the location. There should be no pain in the average, uninjured foot.
 
After you’ve checked your feet, try a balance test. Stand on one foot with your arms out to the side and your eyes closed. If you are less than 30 years old, you should be able to balance for 15 seconds; 30 to 40 years old, for 12 seconds; 40 to 50 years old, for 10 seconds; and over 50 years old, for seven seconds. Balance can be improved with exercises.
 
For more information on foot health and typical foot problems, visit the Adult Foot Health page at FootCareMD.org, the patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS). The site also includes a physician finder that makes it easy to find an orthopaedic foot and ankle specialist in your area.
 
About Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgeons
Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons are medical doctors (MD and DO) who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment, both surgical and nonsurgical, of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries of the foot and ankle. Their education and training consists of four years of medical school, five years of post-graduate residency and often a fellowship year of specialized surgical training. These specialists treat patients of all ages and perform reconstructive surgery for deformities and arthritis, treat sports injuries, and manage foot and ankle trauma.
 
About the AOFAS
As the professional organization of orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons, the AOFAS supports the specialty and other health care providers through evidence-based and best-practice education and research. The Society provides leadership in foot and ankle surgery, serving as a resource for government and industry as well as the national and international health care communities, and promotes preventive foot and ankle care.

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Jennifer Hicks
Director of Membership, Marketing and Communications
Office: 847-430-5079