How to Lace Shoes for Proper Fit

Lacing Techniques for Proper Shoe Fit

Certain lacing techniques for shoes can prevent injuries, alleviate pain and relieve foot problems. If you have specific foot problems, follow these lacing techniques to get a good fit with their shoe:

  • Loosen the laces as you slip into the shoes. This prevents unnecessary stress on the eyelets (small holes for the lace) and the backs of the shoes.

  • Always begin lacing shoes at the eyelets closest to your toes, and pull the laces of one set of eyelets at a time to tighten. This provides for a comfortable shoe fit.

  • When buying shoes, remember that shoes with a larger number of eyelets will make it easier to adjust laces for a custom fit.

  • The conventional method of lacing, crisscross to the top of the shoe, works best for the majority of people.





Narrow Feet

Use the eyelets farthest from the tongue of the shoes. This will bring up the side of the shoe.
 











Wide Feet

Use the eyelets closest to the tongue of the shoe. This technique gives the foot more space.
 









Heel Problems

Use every eyelet, making sure that the area closest to the heel is tied tightly while less tension is used near the toes. When you have reached the next-to-last eyelet on each side, thread the lace through the top eyelet, making a small loop. Then, thread the opposite lace through each loop before tying it.
 








Narrow Heel and Wide Forefoot

Use two laces. Thread through the top half of the eyelets and the other lace through the bottom half of the eyelets. The lace closest to the heel (top eyelets) should be tied more tightly than the other lace closest to the toes (bottom eyelets).
 



 
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